U.S. 98 Pensacola Bay Bridge Erection. Pensacola, Florida


Services Provided by FINLEY:

• Construction Engineering
• Temporary Tower Design
• Erection & Rigging Design
• Barge Stability Analysis
• Barge Structure Interaction Analysis


Owner:

Florida Department of Transportation

Client:

Skanska USA Civil Southeast

Cost:

$398.5M

Start Date:

July 2017

Est. Completion Date:

2021

The new U.S. 98 Pensacola Bay Bridge will carry six lanes of traffic and two pedestrian shared use paths on twin 16,138-ft-long bridges (105 spans) with simply supported span lengths of approximately 105 ft and a three span continuous 795-ft-long unit main span over the Pensacola Bay Channel. The approach spans consist of precast concrete FIB girders. The signature main span consists of three span continuous steel plate girders to support the vehicular traffic with a center span of 375 ft and side spans of 210 ft each. The pedestrian paths are supported by a steel tied arch over the 375 ft main span and steel plate girders at the 210 ft side spans.

As a subcontractor for Skanska USA Civil Southeast, FINLEY Engineering Group (FINLEY) was responsible for construction engineering of the continuous steel plate girder mainspan and signature pedestrian steel tied arch. Per Skanska’s means and methods, the plate girders were assembled on barges and towed to the mainspan for erection. FINLEY provided barge stability analysis for the critical stages of girder assembly, as well as tow analysis and verification of the steel girders for forces and accelerations induced by the barge motions. Additionally, FINLEY provided design for the barge grillage and ballasting. The pedestrian steel tied arch will be erected on a trestle and temporary towers adjacent to the mainspan and towed into place.

FINLEY also provided construction engineering services to verify the arch components during critical erection stages, a stressing sequence for the arch hanger cables, and design of the temporary towers. The steel arch and plate girders are erected with two 888 barge ringer cranes.